Blog : Little Lilypad Co

 frog-facebook     frog-instagram   frog-pintrest  frog-twitter




The Little Lilypad is a lifestyle blog mostly written by a mum to two beautiful, cheeky and entertaining daughters. It is sometimes written by the Man on the Pad, when he is not relaxing in one of our best recliners, or by one of our baby bloggers and occasionally we accept guest posts. There is frequently talk of shoes and clothing (we love fashion and savvy shopping), chocolate (who doesn't love chocolate) education and swimming (we love this too). It is hopefully helpful, sometimes funny and always honest.

search engine by freefind advanced

 RSS Feed

Category: Baby Blog

  1. To bounce or not to bounce? Are baby bouncers harmful to your child's development?

    Posted on

    Being a mum to two girls, there’s no better feeling for a parent than seeing their children wiggle and jiggle and having the best time of their life. However, in more recent times baby bouncers have become a rather controversial piece of equipment, criticized by many for potentially creating more harm than fun. Whilst my girls are past the baby stage, I still have lots of friends becoming pregnant and having little ones, so before purchasing anything for a baby, whether it is baby bouncers, car seats or toys, it is important to do your research – so here is some helpful advice for you!


    Feature image credit: FamVeld/Shutterstock

    Are baby bouncers harmful?

    Like any other piece of equipment, a baby swing or bouncer can potentially be dangerous if not used properly. Most accidents happen due to human misuse, and all parents are advised to read and follow the instructions.

    One mistake most parents do is leaving their children in the bouncer for a long period of time. While it’s nice to have your hands free for a minute, leaving your child in the bouncer for too long could potentially be harmful. The bouncer is designed to secure the baby in a half-lying, half-sitting position, and experts are warning that this may lead to him or her developing positional plagiocephaly, also known as ‘flattened head syndrome’. This is a condition which results in part of a baby’s head becoming flattened due to sustained pressure on one spot. This can be easily avoided by limiting use to 20-30 minutes, and never let your child sleep in the bouncer.

    What the research says

    A study that examined 43 infants and their motor development when using play-assist equipment has left many unsure about the safety of these items. The results revealed that the children using the equipment the most would score lowest on infant motor development, in comparison to those who rarely or never use such equipment. Because there were no other tests to support this study, parents are encouraged to only allow moderate use of such equipment within the home, to ensure healthy child development.


    Credit: didesign021/Shutterstock

    When is it time to stop?

    Whilst you may never want your baby to grow up, they eventually will, and there will be a time when they will be too big for the bouncer. The majority of baby bouncers will only be good if your baby weighs between 18 and 30 pounds. A general rule is that, if your child is big enough to sit on his or her own, then he or she is too big for the bouncer. This usually happens at the age of 6 months. If you want a piece of equipment to last you a little longer, there are some multiple-purpose baby seats that will be suitable for a wider age range. Do your research thoroughly and make sure you only buy products from authorised sellers.


    Let ‘em bounce! But never for longer than about 30 minutes, and make sure you are there to supervise them. Never purchase any piece of equipment without doing your research and always follow safety and operation guidelines. Choose the highest quality for your child, and buying equipment that will suit their age and needs will keep your baby safe and happy. 

  2. The Good Bubble Giveaway

    Posted on

    From swimming to bathtime, we have always been a fan of the water and so were excited to be recently introduced to the Good Bubble range. Good Bubble make natural and fun bath stuff to get you squeaky clean and we especially love that it is all put together at a family business in the heart of England.

    Good Bubble product shot

    So is your little rascal a big fan of messy play and mud pies but not so enamored with the tub time that follows? For fun-filled, tear-free cleansing to gently keep their hair and skin squeaky clean, you should take a little look at the Good Bubble Range which includes :

    • Super Bubbly Bubble Bath with Dragon Fruit Extract 400ml 
    • Super Bubbly Bubble Bath with Cloudberry Extract 400ml
    • Clean as a Bean Shampoo with Cloudberry Extract 250ml
    • Smoothy Softy Conditioner with Cloudberry Extract 250ml
    • Bish Bash Bosh! Hair & Body Wash with Dragon Fruit Extract 250ml
    • Gift Sets complete with Super Bubbly Bubble Bath and Bath Mitt, £8.00

    good bubble gift set

    The colourful collection of natural toiletries for babies and children is packed with nurturing superfruit extracts.  Featuring loveable characters from far away lands, Dexter Dragon Fruit and Clara Cloudberry are sure to put the fun back into bath time. Excellent bubble beard making skills aside, their fruity allergen-free fragrances smell scrummy. You can buy them direct from the Good Bubble online shop or in Sainsburys.
  3. The Baby Essential List

    Posted on

    A few weeks ago I held a friends newborn baby and my ovaries ached (shhh don't tell my husband) and whether is your first, second, third or twentieth thanks to Britain's largest family The Radford's, I don’t think the feeling of excitement, joy and sheer emotion of having a new baby ever changes. However, just as you can feel excited about the prospect you can also feel overwhelmed and worried about it. It’s a rollercoaster ride of emotions that is for sure. Once you are over the initial excitement, you can start to think about the future and preparing yourself for the arrival of your new baby. But what do you really need?

    If this is your second child or beyond, you may be blessed with things you have kept from your first born. The most popular things to keep tend to be push chairs and car seats, even nursery furniture and clothing. So if you do have their benefit now would be the ideal time to sort through the loft or storage areas and see exactly what you have. It can also help determine how much you need to invest in for the new baby. But for some, you are starting from scratch and so you may feel like you have a big endless list of things to buy or consider for your new baby, but actually there are not as many essentials as you possibly once thought.



    Somewhere to sleep

    Baby’s need a place to sleep, after all, they tend to spend those first few weeks sleeping a lot. So you may want to consider what sort of arrangements you are going to have in place for this. Of course, there are moses baskets that offer great flexibility for sleeping. But you could also consider the more permanent arrangements such as a cot that will potentially live in the baby’s nursery. There are all sorts of accessories to consider when it comes to sleeping arrangements, particular mattresses and sleeping aids, so it’s always advisable to do your research to ensure that the products you think you might not will actually be beneficial.

    The feeding arrangements

    Some people choose to breastfeed, others choose to bottle feed. Whichever route you decide to embark on is a decision only you can make and it is personal to you and how you feel. Sometimes you may have plans to feed in a certain way and things just don't go to plan. There are, however, essentials that could work with each type of feeding possibility such as breast pumps for breastfed baby’s or bottles and sterilisers for the bottle fed ones. Make the choice and then ensure you have what you need to embark on the feeding journey you choose.

    Clothing for those first few weeks and months

    We can often get a little carried away when it comes to buying clothes for a new baby. It’s all those cute little outfits you see in shop windows or websites like Next or Zara. The truth is, in those first weeks and months the chances are your new baby will live in rompers and sleepsuits. Cute outfits are great, but don’t have too many where you run the risk of your baby outgrowing them before they even have a chance to wear them. Be careful with your purchases, and instead, by a few months ahead to ensure you have a steady stream of clothing from newborn size onwards.



    Dealing with siblings

    It can be hard to handle siblings when you are expecting a new child. You run the risk of feelings of jealousy creeping or feeling left out. It can be hard to remember at times there are other feelings to consider, especially when you are exciting and concentrating on taking care of yourself through pregnancy. The essential factor here is to ensure that you involve your child in the process of welcoming another baby. That might be a surprise gender reveal or making it a big event to announce the new sibling. It might just be arranging a private scan so that they get to meet their new sibling, a 4D scan could be a great bonding experience.

    Getting out and about

    You might need to consider the getting out and about arrangements for you new baby. Which could mean doing research on travel systems, push chairs and car seats. The car seat essentially is something you need for the hospital to get you home safely, so that may become your priority if you are planning on spreading the bigger purchases. There are options to suit all budgets in this field, and the best advice would be to go out and visit them and try them out and see how they feel. People have opinions from the top end of the budgets right through to some of the cheaper options available on the market.

    Finally, make sure you take care of your own well being. Taking time out for yourself, enjoying a nice book and a relaxing bath. They may not be essentials that cost much, but they can make all the difference to how you feel.

  4. The challenges of being a dad to girls

    Posted on

    We’re all well aware of those parent-child relationship clichés. For as long as we’ve known, families have always, supposedly, been made up of ‘mummy’s boys’ and ‘daddy’s girls’. Yet, while dads do seem to take a shine to their little bundle of sugar and spice, for the blokes, their bond certainly isn’t an easy walk in the park.

    My husband has openly admitted that he is struggling with the girls growing up, not with the day to day stuff but the realisation that they are influenced by so many other things than us and it made me consider the challenges that Dad's face.

    Dads and their lads

    Let’s flip this on its head a little. The father and son thing seems to be founded on quite uncomplicated dynamics. Dad relives his childhood through his little lad, and gets to be a kid again. It’s all good.

    Whether it’s football, fishing, WWE, LEGO… whatever. Dad’s got this. He knows because, really, he’s just a big kid himself. Of course, not for all, but for many, fathers and sons are almost automatically mates. While there’s an element of discipline in the air, friendship is the predominant theme here.

    Stepping into the unknown

    But what is a dad to do when he holds a baby girl in his arms? When she opens his eyes to new worlds of adventure and unthinkable enjoyment? When she grows into a young girl, with newfound independence? Just what is a dad to do? And that is the challenge.


    Girls kick dads right where it hurts. As much as most fathers do everything and anything to protect all of their children, there’s something special about his little girl. Even the sassiest of madams are delicate to dad. They will take him into the unknown, making him vulnerable, as he treads unfamiliar ground and lives completely new experiences with his daughter.

    Protecting something precious

    That innocence, that wonder, must be protected. But how? Wrapping little ones up in cotton wool may well work for the first few years, at a push. But being the shoulder to cry on, the big bear arms, the safe warm chest to lean against, will never grow old. Dad must be reliable, comforting… dad must be the man that never hurts her, never lets her down. The hero.

    The struggle is this, at every stage of his little girl’s life, dad needs to explore emotions, listen to heartaches, offer advice. This is something society just hasn’t encouraged our men to do. Yet, the love they feel for their little girl means it is essential.

    As they grow older, into their tweens, their teens, Dads must fight with their own need to protect their daughter from harm, from hurt. Dad must be there when she falls, allowing his own feelings to take the hit. The journey they’ve had together, that unique bond, makes this all the harder.

    After all, when was letting go of something so precious ever easy?